LDF at the V&A

Not long now kids. Next month in fact.  When the streets of London get taken over with all sorts of design and art, everyone gets blisters from trying vainly to see everything in the guide and we all suffer from vile hangovers. It sounds horrible? What is it? London Design festival of course! The V&A is still the official hub and here we outline just a few things going on in the museum.

Flynn Talbot Reflection Room

Flynn Talbot Reflection Room

Reflection Room by Flynn Talbot, is an immersive coloured light experience that will be the first London Design Festival installation to be housed in the Prince Consort Gallery. The vaulted space is lit at each end to highlight and define the dramatic 35m length of the gallery, its ceiling structure and visitors to the installation. It is illuminated with Talbot’s signature of complementary blue and orange lighting, and large black reflective Barrisol panels are used to expand the width of the space, offering a fragmented view of shifting colours, faceted reflections and light.

 

British designer Ross Lovegrove, inspired by the Devonshire Hunting Tapestries on display at the V&A, has created Transmission, a spectacular 21.3-metre-long fluid and free-standing three dimensional tapestry, using Alcantara®, a tactile and sound absorbent material and an alternate to animal based textiles. The soft undulating folds in the installation highlight and merge both colours and forms of the medieval tapestries. The versatility of the material is exemplified in the different methods of treatment, including colouring and digital embroidery. The installation responds to the rich scenes of wealth and aristocratic fashion depicted in the 15th century tapestries at the V&A, and complements them with its own gold and silver threads, which glint in the gallery lighting. These threads create an ornamental pattern of over 2 million flecks running along the edge of the sculpture.

Ross Lovegrove

Ross Lovegrove

Palestinian architects Elias and Yousef Anastas debut their installation While We Wait. Inspired by the scenic Cremisan Valley located on the seam between Bethlehem and Jerusalem, the installation aims to explore the cultural claim over nature in Palestine. Their work navigates the issues surrounding the construction of a wall through the middle of the Valley in the Palestinian landscape, which has separated links between a monastery and the local community.

While we wait

While We Wait is a stone construction of a lace-like pattern, in which the sophisticated dentelle structure is in stark contrast to the plain uniform concrete of the separation wall. The structure is an immersive space that visitors can enter, feeling the texture of stone and participating in the experience through an ambient soundtrack, as if entering the Cremisan Valley itself.

 

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